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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 4
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Document Description
TitleNewfoundland macroinvertebrate riffle communities and their potential for use in bioassessment
AuthorSmith, Erica L. (Erica Leann), 1982-
DescriptionThesis (M.Sc.)--Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2009. Biology
Date2009
Paginationxiii, 1v. (various foliations) : ill., maps.
SubjectEnvironmental monitoring--Newfoundland and Labrador; Invertebrate communities--Seasonal variations--Newfoundland and Labrador; Invertebrate communities--Variation--Newfoundland and Labrador
DegreeM.Sc.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. Dept. of Biology
DisciplineBiology
LanguageEng
Spatial CoverageCanada--Newfoundland and Labrador
NotesIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 7.1-7.19)
AbstractMacroinvertebrate communities were sampled from 65 Newfoundland riffles from three geographic regions (the Avalon Peninsula, Terra Nova, and Gros Morne) in three seasons (summer, fall, spring). A suite of physical, chemical and land use variables were also measured. Differences in community composition across regions were found as well as large differences among seasons between sites sampled. Macroinvertebrate richness and abundance data were cross-examined with associated environmental variables to detect which ones were most related to macroinvertebrate community differences. UTM Easting, % macrophytes, % igneous rock, % local forest, nitrates, total Nitrogen and alkalinity were all highly correlated with trends in the macroinvertebrate community data. Urban communities differed from rural and pristine communities, the latter two community types being virtually indistinguishable. Temporal effects were examined to tease apart seasonal versus non-seasonal factors affecting the invertebrate-environment relationship. Changes in the frequency of occurrence of a few key taxa between years strongly impacted regional differences.
TypeText
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifiera3243838
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(25.35 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/Smith_EricaL.pdf
CONTENTdm file name152479.cpd