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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 2
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Document Description
TitleThe systematics of the pelagic squid genus Octopoteuthis Ruppell, 1844 (Cephalopoda : Teuthoidea) with emphasis on species in the north Atlantic
AuthorStephen, Stephen J.
DescriptionThesis (M.Sc.)--Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1987. Biology
Date1985
Pagination205 leaves : ill., maps.
SubjectSquids
DegreeM.Sc.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. Dept. of Biology
DisciplineBiology
LanguageEng
NotesBibliography: leaves 161-177.
AbstractThe systematics of the pelagic squid genus Octopoteuthis Ruppell, 1844 is reviewed. Four hundred and fifty-six specimens were examined from museum sources worldwide ranging in size from 1.3 mm - 240 mm dorsal mantle length (ML). Of the nine nominal species five are found to be invalid or considered nomina dubia. All species are found to bear photophores in a variety of body locations. Characters used to separate species include presence of one or two photophores on the posterior-ventral portion of the mantle; presence or absence of anterior eyelid photophores; presence or absence of an eyeball photophore; and presence or absence of accessory cusps (booklets) on the arm hooks. Larval specimens (those less than approximately 25 mm ML and still bearing tentacles or remnants of them) could not be separated into species at present because of the late development of the characters defined above. Discriminant analysis run on morphometric data on each specimen supported the species separation proposed here. Geographic and vertical distribution is also discussed.
TypeText
Resource TypeElectronic thesis or dissertation
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifier75410168
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(31.71 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/Stephen_StephenJ.pdf
CONTENTdm file name94198.cpd