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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 2
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Document Description
TitleThe career patterns, occupational changes and job satisfaction of Newfoundland physical education graduates
AuthorDibbon, David C., 1958-
DescriptionThesis (M.P.E.)--Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1984. Physical Education and Athletics
Date1984
Pagination[xii], 134 leaves : ill.
SubjectPhysical education teachers--Newfoundland and Labrador
DegreeM.P.E.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. School of Physical Education and Athletics.
DisciplinePhysical Education and Athletics
LanguageEng
NotesBibliography: leaves 113-116.
AbstractThe major problem of this study was to determine the career patterns of those individuals who graduated from the School of Physical Education and Athletics, at Memorial University from 1958 to 1982, inclusive. Distinctions were made between four groups of graduates: those still teaching Physical Education in the province of Newfoundland; those who at one time taught Physical Education, but are now teaching in other subject areas or involved in educational administration; those who at one time taught Physical Education but have now divorced themselves from the profession; and those who graduated from the School of Physical Education and Athletics, but never entered the Physical Education teaching profession. Questionnaires were designed and administered to these groups of individuals in an attempt to measure their attitudes towards working in the Physical Education profession. -- Data were also collected on each graduating class at the School of Physical Education and Athletics. In order to analyse the attrition rates of Physical Education teachers and graduates, cohort analyses were completed for five of the graduating classes. -- During the time period studied by the researcher (from 1958 to 1982 inclusive) there were 496 graduates from the School of Physical Education and Athletics. Two hundred and thirty of these graduates were still teaching Physical Education as of June, 1983. -- The data concerning the number of graduates per year are consistent with data collected by Statistics Canada on a national basis. It shows a sharp increase at both levels up to 1979, followed by a minor decrease. -- The results of the cohort analysis were somewhat consistent with earlier studies. However, the major trend identified throughout this study was one of an upward shift in both entrance and survival rates for cohorts graduating into the mid-1970s. Also, while the trend of the downward sloping survival curve was still evident, it was a much gentler slope than in earlier years. -- The investigation into the job satisfaction of Physical Education teachers revealed that many were dissatisfied with the non-human resources they had available to do the job, the comfort and convenience of the job, as well as the recognition and financial considerations they received from their job. Two of these facets were also cited among the most important reasons indicated by ex-Physical Education teachers for leaving the profession. -- This investigation has enabled the researcher to draw the following conclusions: -- 1. Demographic variables have no effect on the overall job satisfaction of Physical Education teachers in Newfoundland. -- 2. Physical Education teachers are satisfied with the following aspects of their jobs: the human resources to do the job, the personal relations they experienced on the job, and the nature of their work. -- 3. Physical Education teachers are dissatisfied with the 'following aspects of their jobs: the non-human resources to do the job, the financial considerations offered by their job, the comfort and convenience of their job, and the recognition they received for their work. -- 4. The attrition rates for Newfoundland Physical Education teachers are lower at present than in earlier years. -- 5. Ex-Physical Education teachers left the profession for many of the same reasons that present Physical Education teachers are dissatisfied, namely, the lack of non-human resources to do the job and the lack of recognition they received for their work. -- 6. Many of the Physical Education graduates would not have studied Physical Education if they had had some form of career guidance. -- 7. The present work load on a Physical Education teacher is too heavy. - 8. A majority of the Physical Education graduates who did not enter the Physical Education teaching profession chose not to enter for their own personal reasons. -- 9. The majority of the Physical Education graduates who leave Physical Education teaching but who remain in education are either promoted to an administrative position or they make a lateral move to teach in other subject areas.
TypeText
Resource TypeElectronic thesis or dissertation
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifier75292388
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(18.96 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/Dibbon_DavidC.pdf
CONTENTdm file name42287.cpd