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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 1
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Document Description
TitleA thematic approach to the teaching of literature in the junior high school
AuthorCahill, E. James(Edward James), 1950-
DescriptionThesis (M.Ed.) -- Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1984. Education
Date1984
Paginationv, 70 leaves
SubjectReading (Secondary); Literature--Study and teaching (Secondary);
DegreeM.Ed.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. Faculty of Education
DisciplineEducation
LanguageEng
NotesBibliography : leaves 67-70.
AbstractThe purpose of this thesis is to propose a thematic organization of teaching literature to students in the junior high school. It is suggested that because of the nature of the 12-15 year old student, who is encountering literature for the first time as an academic subject, the thematic approach best utilizes his natural curiosity and encourages the enjoyment of literature for its own sake. -- The nature and function of literature as it relates to the young reader is explored, and a definition of literature as an imaginative experience is suggested. An exposure of this type to the world of literature would enable the junior high school student to relate to the selections in a manner that is more motivational than are other traditional arrangements. -- The traditional methods of teaching literature are compared to the thematic arrangement, and a means of implementing the thematic model is suggested. The development of a particular theme is also offered as a sample of how the thematic arrangement could be utilized within the classroom.
TypeText
Resource TypeElectronic thesis or dissertation
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifier75292358
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(10.34 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/Cahill_EJames.pdf
CONTENTdm file name315862.cpd