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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 1
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Document Description
TitleA history of the formation and development of Jubilee Guilds/Women's Institutes of Newfoundland and Labrador
AuthorRichard, Agnes M.(Agnes Mary), 1935-
DescriptionThesis (M.Ed.) -- Memorial University of Newfoundland, 1987. Education
Date1987
Paginationix, 304 leaves
SubjectWomen's institutes--Newfoundland and Labrador--History; Women--Newfoundland and Labrador--Social conditions;
DegreeM.Ed.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. Faculty of Education
DisciplineEducation
LanguageEng
Spatial CoverageCanada--Newfoundland and Labrador
NotesBibliography: leaves 282-287.
AbstractFifty-two years ago a tragedy gave birth to the present Newfoundland and Labrador Women's Institutes (formerly known as Jubilee Guilds), yet out of this tragedy has come good fortune for many women in outport Newfoundland. The organization was first formed in response to a disastrous tidal wave which devastated the south coast of Newfoundland in 1929. -- Through their educational programmes, Women's Institutes have earned the title "The Rural Women's University". The group merits this title because it has often been the principal source of information and training centering around concerns such as literacy, nutrition, health, and crafts. Here in Newfoundland, many rural communities had been, until recent times, isolated from sources of general educational services. It was only through a system which Jubilee Guilds and Women's Institutes sponsored, a matter of women helping and teaching other women, that this vital information was made available. -- This significant organizational effort has been part of the Newfoundland culture for more than fifty years. To date, very little of its development has been reported. An important aspect of Newfoundland outport life has been overlooked. There remains the distinct need to document this development before some very valuable first-hand personal accounts will have been lost forever.
TypeText
Resource TypeElectronic thesis or dissertation
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifier75414522
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(60.94 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/Richard_AgnesM.pdf
CONTENTdm file name306129.cpd