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Memorial University - Electronic Theses and Dissertations 1
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Document Description
TitleThe development of a reading comprehension strategy program for elementary students entitled 'Learning How' Module 1 - Summarizing
AuthorBillings, Dolores Merici, 1952-
DescriptionThesis (M.Ed.)--Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2001. Education
Date2001
Paginationiii, 33, 99 leaves.
SubjectReading comprehension; Reading (Elementary)
DegreeM. Ed.
Degree GrantorMemorial University of Newfoundland. Faculty of Education
DisciplineEducation
LanguageEng
NotesIncludes bibliographical references.
AbstractThe purpose of this project was to develop a reading comprehension strategy program integrated with the elementary social studies content. I chose to do this for four reasons (a) research has shown that students can learn strategies (b) strategies are best taught explicitly within a content area (c) teachers do not have the time to develop such programs and, (d) strategy instruction does improve comprehension. -- Research shows that good readers use the following four strategies - summarizing, clarifying, questioning, and predicting (Jones et al., 1987). It is also noted in research that it is better to teach one strategy at a time (Pressley et al., 1987, 1989). The comprehension strategy of summarizing has been shown as the most important strategy of the four (Jones et al., 1987). -- Therefore, I have chosen to develop the unit using the summarizing strategy. The social studies content will be based on outcomes from Strand 1 of the new Atlantic Social Studies Elementary Curriculum.
TypeText
Resource TypeElectronic thesis or dissertation
FormatImage/jpeg; Application/pdf
SourcePaper copy kept in the Centre for Newfoundland Studies, Memorial University Libraries
Local Identifiera1521760
RightsThe author retains copyright ownership and moral rights in this thesis. Neither the thesis nor substantial extracts from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission.
CollectionElectronic Theses and Dissertations
Scanning StatusCompleted
PDF File(3.60 MB) -- http://collections.mun.ca/PDFs/theses/DoloresBillings.PDF
CONTENTdm file name23817.cpd