Digital Archives Initiative

Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador Publications, 1943-1986



The Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador Publications, 1943-1986

The Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador was established in 1944 as the Newfoundland Tuberculosis Association (NTA), with the mandate to control the spread of tuberculosis in the province.

The NTA became the Newfoundland Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association in 1970, after the Canadian Tuberculosis Association had recognized the need to fight other respiratory diseases and changed its name to the Canadian Tuberculosis and Respiratory Disease Association (CTRDA). Education programs were established on asthma, the effects of smoking and lung cancer. When the CTRDA changed its name to the Canadian Lung Association, the Newfoundland branch followed suit in 1982, adopting the title of Newfoundland Lung Association. Today, the Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador focuses on a variety of lung diseases, providing province wide programs and services about control and prevention.

The Happy Warrior was created by Ted Meaney, an ex-tuberculosis patient, in an effort to educate Newfoundlanders about the spread of Tuberculosis. Mr. Meaney went on to become the first full time secretary of the Newfoundland Tuberculosis Association, which began publishing The Northern Light in 1949.

The Faculty of Medicine Founders' Archive (FMFA) and the Health Archives and Museum of Newfoundland and Labrador (HAMNL) partnered in 2009-2010 in a project to digitize the newsletters of the NLA, The Happy Warrior and The Northern Light. These newsletters form part of the Lung Association of Newfoundland and Labrador records housed at HAMNL (fonds A008-003).

List of Collections

The Happy Warrior 1943-1947
The Northern Light 1949-1986



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Sponsor

Memorial University - Faculty of Medicine Founders' Archive