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100 Year Diary: A Chronology of Newfoundland History from 1879-1978.

This unique item was created in 1979 when the St. John's daily newspaper, The Telegram, celebrated its 100th anniversary. It is a timeline of events covering 100 years of Newfoundland history mixed with world events. The timeline appears to be a reprint of the "50 years Ago Today" and "25 years Ago Today" columns. Printed on a single piece of paper it measures 1 ½ inches wide by 36 ½ feet long.

The original document is held in the Michael Harrington Collection, Coll-307. Harrington was the editor of The Telegram from 1959 to 1982. For more information on this collection, click here.



Bonavista Methodist Church

Located on the northeastern tip of the Bonavista peninsula, the municipality of Bonavista is one of the oldest towns on the northeast coast of Newfoundland. On June 24th, 1497, John Cabot, an Italian explorer sailing under the British flag for King Henry VII, made landfall in the New World.

Methodism was founded in Newfoundland in 1766 with the arrival of Rev. Laurence Coughlan, a newly-ordained Church of England priest who had been converted to Methodism some 13 years previously.

The first Methodist Church in Bonavista was constructed in 1814 under the ministry of Rev. William Ellis. It served the people of Bonavista for 35 years when it was enlarged to house the growing population. However, on January 8, 1870 a severe storm destroyed the church. It was rebuilt within a year under the ministry of Rev. John S. Phimmey. The building could seat 800 people; however, with time the population grew and a larger building was needed, so on March 4, 1918 the church was taken down in order to build a new one. The fourth and present church was completed in 1921 under the leadership of Rev. Charles Lench. It is 65 feet wide and 124 feet long with a seating capacity of 1200 which makes it the largest wooden church in Eastern Canada. The design is "Classical Revival Style" which was widely popular at this time. It has an open scissor-brace rafter system, a timber balloon frame, and a combination stone-concrete foundation. The church was designed by architect Charles H. Lench, M.Arch. (Harvard). The Master Builder of the church was Ronald Strathie, who also built other structures in Bonavista. The tower clock was purchased from the Howard Clock Company in New York and was installed by Mr. Strathie and has long been a landmark for local fishermen returning to port.

A special ceremony was held for the laying of the cornerstone on October 31, 1921. The cornerstone contains a box filled with contemporary copies of newspapers, the "Methodist Monthly Greeting," circulating coins, and a list of the officials attending the ceremony.

The fine stained glass window in the facade was donated by the Swyers Family in memory of those who lost their lives in war; it portrays Christ as the Good Shepherd, and incorporates symbols appropriate to The United Church of Canada.

The building was dedicated on 28th January, 1923. Two years later, upon church union, the Methodist church became part of The United Church of Canada.

The church seats 1375 people and is filled to capacity when used for occasions of a special nature, such as ecumenical services, high school graduation ceremonies, and special performances such as Handel's "Messiah" given by the Newfoundland Symphony Orchestra and its Philharmonic Choir, an event held first held during the Christmas Season of 1996 and again in 2008.

The church has a thriving Sunday School, active adult groups - United Church Women and Men's Fellowship Group - as well as a Junior and Senior Choir, Mime Group, and Messenger Group. Weekly Prayer Services are held and there are Sunday evening "After Services" following the regular evening worship.

From Charles Lench, The Story of Methodism in Bonavista
Encyclopedia of Newfoundland and Labrador
http://www.heritage.nf.ca/society/methodist.html
http://www.memorialunited.ca/page2.html




Bowring Park Photo Albums
Photo Album 1, Photo Album 2

Bowring Park Photograph Albums Coll-311

This collection consists of two photograph albums showing the creation of Bowring Park during the years 1912 to 1914. The photos were taken by landscape architect, Rudolph Cochius. The albums were donated to the Archives and Special Collections by the Bowring Park Foundation in 2002. Rudolph Cochius had worked on landscape and road construction projects in Holland, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium and France before immigrating to Canada in 1911. The following year he went to St. John's to supervise the development of the new park. In a preliminary report on the project submitted to Sir Edgar Bowring, Cochius wrote "It would hardly seem possible that a greater number of attractive natural features could be combined within such an area, almost surrounded as it is by the north and south rivers, whose well wooded banks make a very pleasing boundary for the proposed Park, while the interior of the property is for the most part open and well adapted for play-grounds and other public purposes."
He went on to recommend "I think the most important play-grounds, such as tennis, bowling, etc., should be located in the vicinity of the shelter; but there should also be provided, on the level area below the bridge, a pool for bathing, etc. Suitable bathing houses should also be provided." Cochius spent the next two years designing the layout for Bowring Park and after it opened on July 14, 1914, he agreed to remain as park superintendent and oversee future development of the landscape.
In 1920 Cochius returned to Europe where he spent 1920 and 1921 as a town planner in Belgium. The Newfoundland Government wanted to create war memorial parks at the five main European battle sites where the Newfoundland Regiment fought and sustained major casualties. In 1922 Prime Minister Richard Squires approached Cochius to design these parks in France and Belgium. When this work was completed, in 1925, he returned to Newfoundland where he was appointed a member of the Newfoundland Highroads Commission. During this time he also designed Mount Pearl Park. In 1928 he was appointed to the first St. John's Town Planning Commission, established by St. John's City Council. In 1934, the Newfoundland Government appointed him to the governing board for the Markland Land Settlement, the first of the Commission of Government schemes to create a series of farming communities in rural Newfoundland. Rudolf Cochius married Marie Aarsen of Amsterdam on December 7, 1911. Cochius died in March 1944.

For more information on this please see the Finding Aid for the Bowring Park Photograph Albums Coll-311

Charles Sydney Frost Collection
Album

The photographs in this album were collected by Charles Sydney Frost during his service with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment in the First World War. Most of the photographs were taken between 1914 and 1918. They are snapshots of Regiment officers while in the United Kingdom and France. The majority of these men were from "B" Company and it is likely that the photos of these men were taken while C.S. Frost presided over that company as Captain. Also contained in the album are reproductions of the 12 Newfoundland stamps that were issued to honor the Regiment's service in World War One.

For more information on this please see the Finding Aid for the Frost Collection Coll-346

Frew and Tessier Photo Albums
Album 1, Album 2

These two photograph albums contain black and white photographs, mostly of St. John's and surrounding area, and were probably collected by the Frew family of St. John's. They appear to be taken around the turn of the century and contain several good images of St. John's after the Great Fire of 1892. On the inside back cover there is written "G.J. Tessier, Amateur photographer".

The albums were apparently also used as scrapbooks and contains paper images of, possibly, Africa.
The albums were given to the Archives and Special Collections in 2000 by Dr Tom Nemec.

For more information on this please see the Finding Aid for the Collection Coll-346

Galway as a Transatlantic Port by Richard J. Kelly, Barrister at Law, 1903

In 1903, Richard Kelly sent a copy of his book, Galway as a Transatlantic Port, to Sir Robert Bond, the Prime Minister of Newfoundland. The original is housed in the Bond Collection, Coll-237, file 11.01.008. The file also contains a letter from Kelly to Bond.

For more information on the Robert Bond collection, see the finding aid COLL-199. Series 11, in particular, consists of material related to Bond's interests and involvement in an all British trans-Atlantic shipping route which would include Newfoundland as a trans-shipment point.

Richard John Kelly (1856-1931)

Richard John Kelly, a newspaper editor and lawyer, was born January 20, 1856 and educated at Blackrock College and QCG and became a reporter and editorial writer for the Tuam Herald before assuming full control.

Kelly was called to the bar in 1886 and built up a successful practice on the Connacht circuit, becoming a king's counsel in 1914. He published numerous legal works. Kelly took a strong interest in local matters and lobbied for the development of Galway as an Atlantic port.

Richard John Kelly died 3 September 1931 in Dublin and was buried at Glasnevin cemetery. He married Edith Mackey of Southampton; they had one son, Richard Jasper and six daughters.

From the Dictionary of Irish Biography, Cambridge University Press.



George Bond Collection
The Story of The Sing Yet, Photographs of Rag Dolls

George Bond (1850-1933), Methodist minister and writer, was born on 1 July 1850 in St. John's, the eldest son of John Bond and Elizabeth Roberts. He received his early education in St. John's, and in 1869 decided to enter the Methodist ministry. He was accepted as a candidate in 1871, and studied for the ministry at Mount Allison Methodist College in Sackville, New Brunswick; he graduated in 1874. He was ordained into the Methodist ministry at George Street Methodist Church in St. John's on 26 June 1876.

In 1891 Bond transferred to Nova Scotia. He served in Halifax at Grafton Methodist Church and Oxford Street Church, and at Canso. In 1895 he was appointed editor of The Wesleyan, a monthly church magazine published in Halifax.

While he was serving in Nova Scotia, Bond spent a year, 1907-1908, in China and Japan studying the church's missionary work there. His visit took him up the Yangtze River where he saw first-hand the work of the Methodist missionaries in that part of the country. After his return to Halifax, he used what he had learned, together with photographs he had taken in China, to give public lectures on this facet of the church's work.

George Bond retired from the active ministry in 1923. He spent part of his retirement in Halifax, but also lived part of each year at the Grange, which he inherited after his brother's death in 1927.

Series 2.03 documents his involvement with the Methodist Church in China and includes: diaries, notebooks, lantern slides, posters, and books. One book titled The Story of The Sing Yet Family by J L Stewart, c. 1910 included "Rag Dolls" to use as illustrations to accompany the book.

For more information on the George Bond Collection, see finding aid COLL-236 here.

Gustav Anderson Photograph Album

Gustav Anderson Photograph Album Coll-429
Photos in this album were taken by Gustav Anderson for the Newfoundland Tourist Development Board in 1950.
Gustav Anderson (1897-1974), photoengraver, pictorial photographer, salon exhibitor, was born in Stockholm, Sweden, on 17 October 1897. He died on 9 November 1974 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the home of his Stella.
Anderson grew up in a rural village in Sweden. By age fourteen, he was employed in a photoengraving shop and studying art in night school. He subsequently worked in the Swedish film industry where he reportedly hand-developed the first Greta Garbo film. He emigrated to the United States circa 1925; in 1928 he settled in Amityville, Long Island, and worked nearly all his life as a photoengraver in New York.

For more information on the Gustav Anderson Collection, see finding aid see Coll-429 here.

The Job Kean Collection
In 1997 Janet Davis and Duke Kelloway, from Wesleyville, became the new owners of the old Job Kean premises in Brookfield, Bonavista Bay. Among the items purchased with the house were hundreds of Christmas cards dating from 1905 to 1926. The following year Ms Davis donated this wonderful collection to the Archives and Special Collections division of the Queen Elizabeth II Library.

Job Kean's family moved from Flower's Island, Bonavista Bay, to Norton's Cove in 1878. The Keans were seafaring people. Job's uncle, the famous Captain Abram Kean, (who subsequently renamed Norton's Cove to Brookfield) was the most successful sealing captain in Newfoundland history. Like his uncles and brothers, Job participated in the seal fishery in the spring of the year and in the cod fishery on the Labrador coast during the summer. He served as captain of the sealing ship the S.S. Erik for 12 years and was captain of the S.S. Leopard during the Greenland disaster of 1898.

Captain Job Kean (1863-1945) married Virtue Maria Hann (1858-1929) of Cape Cove. They built a three-storey Mansard-roofed house in Norton's Cove in 1884, and around 1890 opened a shop that supplied ships' provisions - groceries, clothing, salt - in essence, everything from "a needle to an anchor". Job and Virtue had eleven children: five sons: Hedley Walter (d.1892, 7 mos.) Baxter Wesley (1895-1976) who was to remain a bachelor and inherit the family property: Alexander Smith (d. 1905, 10 mos.) and Charles (1901-1975) who married Lydia Parsons of cat Harbour, and six daughters: Maggie Marcilla Hann (b.1884) who married Baxter Barbour from Newtown; Sophie who moved to New York and subsequently married there; Gladys Murray (d. 1891, 7 mos.); Mary Jane (d. 1897, 5 mos.); Daisy, who married Job Wornell of Greenspond and later Joseph Bartlett; and Carrie who graduated from the Friends Hospital in Philadelphia as a nurse. The Kean shop was the centre of commerce in the Brookfield area. Located near the harbour front, Kean's ships had easy access to the shop when they arrived in port for supplies and merchandise. Kean's also supplied other local sailing vessels. According to residents, Aunt Virtue and her son Baxter would usually be found behind the counter. In addition, Virtue ran the telegraph and post office from these premises.

Virtue Kean also became famous as a poet and a songwriter. According to tradition, she wrote the folk song "Lukey's Boat" and performed it one night at the Methodist Church Hall as a way of poking fun at local resident Luke Gaulton. As she sang verse after verse ridiculing both him and his boat, the audience roared with laughter. Gaulton later added a verse of his own, making fun of Virtue's well-known hypochondria.

Virtue died in 1929 and in 1945, after Job's death, Baxter was left to carry on alone. At his death, the business passed to his nephew Job Kean, son of Charlie Kean, who eventually closed up shop in the 1970s and moved to St. John's.

Today there is a new and thriving enterprise on the old Kean property. Janet Davis, after lovingly restoring the shop to its former glory, operates the Norton's Cove Studio from there in the award-winning heritage structure.

For more about Job Kean see the Archives finding aid COLL-339



Lester Barbour Collection Coll-209
The Barbour family of Newtown, Bonavista Bay, were very prominent in Newfoundland history. Members of the family are found in many walks of life including master mariners, sealing captains, school teachers, clergy, sailors, lawyers, politicians, and soldiers.

According to family history, the first Barbour to come to Newfoundland from England was Captain George Barbour arrived in Greenspond, Bonavista Bay, in the early part of the 19th century. He had one son, Benjamin Barbour, (1809-1891). Around 1824 Benjamin Barbour moved to Pinchard's Island and in 1843 he settled at Cobbler's Island, a small island southwest of Cape Freels. In 1841, Benjamin Barbour married Rebecca Green of Greenspond (1820-1906) and they had eleven children: Joseph, William, Thomas, George, James, John, Benjamin, Samuel, Edward, Mary and Keziah. The first five sons were well-known sealing captains. Benjamin, Samuel and Edward were engaged in the fishery but later, Edward and Samuel went into business forming a partnership known as "E.& S. Barbour" in Newtown with a branch in St. John's.

Edward Barbour was born August 2, 1862 at Cobbler's Island and died June 8, 1912 at the age of 50. He married Mary Jane Kean of Brookfield, Bonavista Bay, who was born July 2, 1866 at Flower's Island and died July 4, 1941 at the age of 75. Edward and Mary Jane Barbour had nine children: Clarissa, Sybil, Lester, Job Kean, Elsie, Clifton (died in infancy), Wilhelmina, Clarence (died in infancy), and Carlson.

In 1917 Lester Densmore Barbour, eldest son of the Edward and Mary Jane Barbour, enlisted with the Royal Newfoundland Regiment. He died on March 10, 1918, of wounds that were sustained during the Battle of Paschendale Ridge. While overseas, in England and in France, Lester Barbour wrote home regularly to his mother and sisters.

This collection consists of the Lester Barbour correspondence.

For further information about the Barbour family see The Exploits and Anecdotes of the Barbours of Bonavista Bay by Carl Barbour, 1973.



Margaret (Mayo) Chancey Diary

This diary was kept by a young woman in her mid-twenties during the year 1897. It contains a brief entry for each day; nothing spectacular, just ordinary events in the life of a young woman living in St. John's as the end of a century approached. She records the weather, what she did each day, shopping expeditions, church services, tea parties, staying at home with her mother. But the physical diary tells as much about the young woman as what she writes. Her literacy and writing ability attest to a good education. On the cover of the diary she has written her name and address. The family home was located at 31 Cookstown Road, a street which was up over the hill from downtown, running north through LeMarchant Road.

This diary should prove to be of interest to social historians, students of autobiography and women's studies, and all who are curious about the writings of a young woman in the St. John's of 1897.

Margaret Jane Hill Mayo was born in St. John's in 1871 or 1872. She was the youngest of three children born to William Mayo (1829-1904) and Rebecca Butler (1833-1912). Her older sister, Mary, was born in 1861, married Eli Benson of Grate's Cove in 1885 and died in 1889 at the age of 28. Her brother, John Frederick, was born in 1869, married Rebecca Rogers, and died in 1944. William Mayo's grandfather, also William Mayo, came to Newfoundland from Great Britain with the Royal Newfoundland Company, a military force stationed in St. John's, in the 1790s. He married Frances King in St. John's in 1796 and they had four children, one of whom was James Mayo. James married Mary Dagwell of St. John's and they, too, had four children, the eldest of whom was William Mayo.

Very little is known of Margaret Mayo's life. The Mayo's attended Gower Street Methodist Church, so it would seem likely that Margaret and her siblings attended the Methodist Academy, on Long's Hill. While she may have worked after finishing school, there is no indication of this in the diary that she kept during 1897. Her days in that year were filled with shopping, visiting, and attending church services and church-related events.

On August 8, 1901 Margaret married Lloyd Tocque Chancey (1865-1931) of St. John's. The ceremony took place at Gower Street Methodist Church and was conducted by Rev. William Rice, the groom's mother's brother. Lloyd Chancey was the youngest son of William George Fletcher Chancey (1820-1895) and Eliza Chancey Rice. The Chancey family had been resident in Newfoundland since the late-1700s, when Lionel Chancey (c. 1751-1822) moved to Harbour Grace from Collompton, Devon; Lionel was Lloyd Chancey's great-grandfather. Lloyd's middle name, Tocque, is probably after the Rev. Philip Tocque (1814-1899), author and clergyman of Carbonear, who married Lloyd father's sister, Eliza.

Margaret Mayo and Lloyd Chancey had four children: one daughter, Pearl, and three sons, Victor, Reginald and Roy; only Roy married, to Blanche Adams. Lloyd Chancey was a barber by profession. The family lived first at Richmond Cottage on Freshwater Road, but sometime after William Mayo's death in 1904, they moved in with Margaret's mother, Rebecca, at 31 Cookstown Road. Records of their life together are scarce, but one can safely assume that Margaret spent her married life raising their children and being a homemaker. After her marriage she began attending her husband's church, the Queen's Road Congregational Church where she sang in the choir. Lloyd Chancey died on September 26, 1931. His wife survived him by ten years, dying September 19, 1941 after a lengthy illness.

For more about Margaret Chancey see the Archives finding aid MF-150



Maria Patience Andrews Exercise Book

Maria Patience Andrews papers, MF-222

This collection consists of an exercise book kept by Maria Patience Andrews when she was a student in Port de Grave. It contains containing songs, poetry and some punishment lines, handwritten by Andrews, c. 1881. The exercise book was donatedby her granddaughter, Anne Dixon, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, in 1985.

For more information see the Finding Aid by clicking here MF-222



Maxwell Cook Collection, Coll-415

Photograph Album
This collection consists of one photograph album which contains 205 black and white photographs. The photographs were taken by Maxwell Cook when he served with the Royal Canadian Air Force in World War II.

Maxwell Ernest Cook was born August 12, 1921, the son of Johanna (King) Cook and Tasker Cook, at St. John's. He had two brothers: Tasker and Angus, and, three sisters: Phyllis, Douglass and Rita. Little is known of his life, he was educated at Bishop Feild College and was active in the Church Lads Brigade (CLB), a Church of England organization. He married June Howse on October 1, 1946. They had two sons and three daughters.

With the outbreak of World War II and the subsequent building of the American base, Fort Pepperell, in St. John's, Cook worked with a construction company at the base. Sometime after this he worked at the Royal Canadian Airforce base in Torbay. In 1942 he joined the RCAF and moved to Lachine, Quebec, for three months training followed by training in London, Ontario. He went overseas in 1944. Following the war he worked with the fire departments in St. John's: first at the Central Fire Station in 1948 and then various stations, ending up at the Kent's Pond station until his retirement in 1972.

He was a member of the Masons, the Royal Canadian Legion, and a faithful member of St. Thomas's Anglican Church.
Maxwell Cook died November 10, 1994.

For more information see the Finding Aid by clicking here Coll-415



Micmac Catechism
This is a Micmac Catechism , titled "Buch das gut, enthaltend den Katechismus, Betrachung, Gesand". Printed in Germany in 1866.
Given to William Bennett, Gander, by Mateau Gidore at Burnt Woods, near Conne River, in July 1965, in "appreciation for a float plane ride". Donated to Archives and Special Collections, Memorial University, by William Bennett March 22, 1999.
This book has been in private hands for the past 130 plus years, which has resulted in much wear and tear. Dr Hans Rollmann believes it to be one of only a few copies of this book in existence. There is one at Harvard and one at Georgetown University. For more information see the Archives findind aid COLL-462

Newfoundland Delegation, Ottawa, 1948, Photograph Album
In 1948 Gordon Winter was appointed a delegate to negotiate and sign the Terms of Union between Newfoundland and Canada.

This photograph album with 37 black and white photographs depicts the signing of the Terms of Union and the delegations.

The Gordon Winter collection contains minutes of meetings, reports, financial statements, correspondence, and photographs, related to the negotiations between Canada and Newfoundland that resulted in Newfoundland's entry into the Canadian confederation. It also includes a Gordon Winter's copy of the Terms of Union and the pen he used in signing it.

Gordon Winter was born in St. John's in 1912, the son of Ethel (Arnaud) and Robert Gordon Winter. He was educated at Bishop Feild College in St. John's and Loretto School, Musselburgh, Scotland. He married Millicent Anderson. At the age of 18 Winter joined the family firm of T. and M. Winter Ltd., a firm of commercial agents and importers that was founded in 1878.

This photograph album is part of the Gordon Winter Collection, Coll-363. For more information on this Collection, click here.

Newfoundland Scenery presented to Joseph Laurence
by The Members of the Newfoundland Conference

This album of photographs appears to be the work of Simeon H. Parsons (1844-1908), one of Newfoundland's earliest professional, self-taught and award-winning photographers. The photographs are very much in the style for which Parsons was noted and cover a wide geographic area, including the Burin Peninsula and coastal Labrador, in addition to more easily accessible areas such as St. John's and eastern Newfoundland communities. Internal evidence dates some of the images to around 1884-1885, and given that the recipient of the album, Joseph Laurence, died in October 1886, it would appear safe to assume that the album was compiled during those middle years of the 1880s. Some of the images may date earlier, possibly from stock photographs Parsons may have had on hand.The album contains some rare images of St. John's streets and buildings that were later destroyed in the 1892 fire that ravaged most of the downtown of the city. It also contains images of people at work in the fishery, particularly on the coast of Labrador; various communities on the Burin Peninsula and on the east coast of Newfoundland; rural scenes, including rivers, lakes and waterfalls; icebergs; groups of people, particularly several gatherings of Methodist clergy, some of whom Laurence was probably responsible for sending to Newfoundland.The album should prove beneficial to researchers interested in architectural and municipal development, the development of Methodism, the history of photography, the work of Simeon Parsons, and a variety of other subjects pertaining to Newfoundland in the latter half of the Nineteenth Century.

For more information on the collection please visit the finding aid by clicking COLL-199



Nominal Census Exploits River, Cape John and Fogo Island, 1836

Series 8 in Coll-150 includes a handwritten nominal census for 1836 for the area from Exploits River to Cape John and Fogo Island. This census is just one part of the entire collection which has been scanned and placed on this website.
The Peyton Family Collection consists of a variety of records deposited in the Archives and Special Collections division by Ernest Peyton of Gander, Newfoundland, as well as material concerning the Peyton family which was transferred from other collections in the Archives. Ernest Peyton is a direct descendant of John Peyton, Senior, the progenitor of a family which has played a prominent role in Newfoundland history: John Peyton, Senior (1747-1827), his son, John Peyton, Junior (1793 -1879), and his son, Thomas Peyton, residents of Exploits Island and Twillingate.

The material in this collection ranges from 1806 to 1908 and was mainly written by the Peytons mentioned above. There are a number of legal journals, wills, notary work for shipping wrecks, and writs issued for the Supreme Court. There are two voters lists for Twillingate district (1882 and 1889) which may be the only ones extant from before 1900. A valuable item is the 1836 nominal census for Twillingate and Fogo area which is probably the only one of its kind to have survived from before 1900. The register of fishing rooms (1806-1828) is a rare treasure which should be of interest to historians, demographers, geographers, and genealogists. Other material includes memorials of indentures generated through the Deputy Surveyor's Office, Twillingate, from 1851 to 1908; and, navigational aids for sailing from Newfoundland to a variety of places in Spain, Portugal, Italy, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States of America, and the West Indies.

For more information on the collection please visit the finding aid by clicking Coll-150

Peyton Family Collection Land Surveys
The Peyton Family Collection

Series 7 in the Peyton Family Collection, consists of several hundred original, hand-drawn, surveys of land in the Twillingate area, covering the period, 1862-1910. These surveys, which are just one part of the entire collection, have been scanned and placed on this website.

For more information on the collection please visit the finding aid by clicking COLL-150



Ruby Ayre Photograph Album, 1916-1918

Ruby Ayre was a nurse with a detachment of British Red Cross Society, from 1915-1918. She married Edward Emerson. This collection consists of a scrapbook with photographs kept during her wartime nursing service in the Ascot Auxiliary Military Hospital, a detachment of the British Red Cross Society. It includes photographs, clippings and mementos of Newfoundlanders in Europe and fellow nurses, Janet Ayre, Mary Rendell and Nell Job.







For more information on the collection please visit the finding aid by clicking COLL-322



Register for rooms at Twillingate, 1806 to 1828

Series 3 in Coll-150 includes Legal Records from 1799-1910. The Register of rooms at Twillingate, 1806 to 1828 is just one part of the entire collection which has been scanned and placed on this website.
The Peyton Family Collection consists of a variety of records deposited in the Archives and Special Collections division by Ernest Peyton of Gander, Newfoundland, as wll as material concerning the Peyton family which was transferred from other collections in the Archives. Ernest Peyton is a direct descendant of John Peyton, Senior, the progenitor of a family which has played a prominent role in Newfoundland history: John Peyton, Senior (1747-1827), his son, John Peyton, Junior (1793 -1879), and his son, Thomas Peyton, residents of Exploits Island and Twillingate

The material in this collection ranges from 1806 to 1908 and was mainly written by the Peytons mentioned above. There are a number of legal journals, wills, notary work for shipping wrecks, and writs issued for the Supreme Court. There are two voters lists for Twillingate district (1882 and 1889) which may be the only ones extant from before 1900. A valuable item is the 1836 nominal census for Twillingate and Fogo area which is probably the only one of its kind to have survived from before 1900. The register of fishing rooms (1806-1828) is a rare treasure which should be of interest to historians, demographers, geographers, and genealogists. Other material includes memorials of indentures generated through the Deputy Surveyor's Office, Twillingate, from 1851 to 1908; and, navigational aids for sailing from Newfoundland to a variety of places in Spain, Portugal, Italy, the United Kingdom, Canada, the United States of America, and the West Indies.

For more information on the collection please visit the finding aid by clicking Coll-150

Sir Richard Squires and Lady Helena Squires Passports

Coll-250 Sir Richard Squires Collection

Newfoundland Passports
Sir Richard Squires Passport
Lady Helena Squires Passport

The Dominion of Newfoundland was a British Dominion from 1907 to 1949 (before which the territory had the status of a British colony, self-governing from 1855). The Statute of Westminster of 11 December 1931 provided a mechanism for Newfoundland to achieve independence within the British Commonwealth, but rather than ratify it, after the near bankruptcy in 1933, on 16 February 1934 the Newfoundland Parliament passed an Address to the Crown relinquishing self- government. Responsible government in Newfoundland voluntarily ended and governance of the dominion reverted to direct control from London. Between 1934 and 1949 a six-member Commission of Government (plus a governor) administered Newfoundland, reporting to the Dominions Office in London. Newfoundland remained a de jure dominion until it joined Canada in 1949 to become Canada's tenth province.

Sir Richard Squires served as Prime Minister of Newfoundland from 1919 to 1923 and 1928 to 1932. The passports shown here are part of a larger collection. The passports were issued to Sir Richard Squires and Lady Helena Squires.

Richard Anderson Squires was born in Harbour Grace on January 18, 1880, the son of Alexander Squires and Sydney Anderson. He received his early education there at the Grammar School and at the Methodist Academy, Carbonear, before completing his schooling in St. John's at the Methodist College (later Prince of Wales College). He attended Dalhousie University, Halifax, where he studied law, graduating with an L.L.B. in 1901. He was first elected to the Newfoundland House of Assembly in the election of May 8, 1909. He served as Prime Minister and Colonial Secretary: 1919-1923, and Prime Minister, Minister of Justice and Attorney General: 1928-1932.

The original passports are held in the Sir Richard Squires Collection, Coll-250. For more information on this collection, click here.



Sir Richard Squires Photo Album - European Tour 1920

Sir Richard Squires served as Prime Minister of Newfoundland from 1919 to 1923 and 1928 to 1932.
The photograph album shown here is part of a larger collection. It was donated to the Archives and Special Collections by Squires’s grandson Robert Squires, in March 2014. The photo album depicts Sir Richard Squires tour of Europe in 1920 and includes images of the Beaumont Hamel battleground. His wife, Lady Helena Squires, daughter, Elaine, and Sir William Coaker also accompanied him on the tour.
Richard Anderson Squires was born in Harbour Grace on January 18, 1880, the son of Alexander Squires and Sydney Anderson. He received his early education there at the Grammar School and at the Methodist Academy, Carbonear, before completing his schooling in St. John's at the Methodist College (later Prince of Wales College). He attended Dalhousie University, Halifax, where he studied law, graduating with an L.L.B. in 1901. He was first elected to the Newfoundland House of Assembly in the election of May 8, 1909. He served as Prime Minister and Colonial Secretary: 1919-1923, and Prime Minister, Minister of Justice and Attorney General: 1928-1932.


For more information on the Sir Richard Squires Collection, see finding aid Coll-250 here.

Terms of Union of Newfoundland with Canada

In the summer of 1948 a seven-member delegation from Newfoundland traveled to Ottawa to discuss possible terms for the entry of Newfoundland into the Canadian Confederation. After several months of negotiations, agreement was finally reached and "Terms of Union" between Newfoundland and Canada were formally signed on December 11, 1948. Canadian Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent and Defence Minister Brooke Claxton joined six of the seven Newfoundland delegates - Sir Albert Walsh, F. Gordon Bradley, Philip Gruchy, John B. McEvoy, Joseph R. Smallwood and Gordon A. Winter (Chesley Crosbie refused to sign) - in appending their names to the document. Copies of the signed "Terms of Union" were given to each of the signatories. The copy seen here was Smallwood's. There are also photographs from Smallwood's personal collection of the signing ceremony.

For more about The Terms of Union see the J. R. Smallwood finding aid, Coll-075.



Trip to the Newfoundland Seal Hunt 1937 by P. Derrick Bowring

Trip to the Newfoundland Seal Hunt 1937 is a scrapbook compiled by P. Derrick Bowring in 1937 following a trip to the seal hunt, off the Newfoundland northeast coast, aboard the S.S. Imogene, a Bowring Brothers ship. It includes diary entries describing daily life onboard, photographs of sealers, stowaways, and seals. In addition there are original telegrams to Bowring Brothers head office from the front, and newspaper accounts of the voyage. There is also a detailed hand drawn chart of the ship's route. The Captain of the S.S. Imogene was Albert Blackwood.

S.S. Imogene
The S.S Imogene was built at Southbank-on-Tees, England, by Smith's Stock Co. for Bowring Brothers of St. John's. The 715-ton ship, designed and powered to cope with Arctic ice, was the last vessel built specifically for sealing and participated in the seal hunt from 1929 to 1940. Captain Albert Blackwood was master of the Imogene from 1928 to 1936 during which time he averaged over 36,000 seals per year, a record in the industry.

P. Derrick Bowring
Derrick Bowring (1916-2009) was the eldest son of Cyril and Clara Bowring. Born in Liverpool, England, he came out to Newfoundland in 1935 to join Bowring Brothers Ltd. He rose through the management ranks, retiring in 1977 as Chair of the Board of Directors. He married Moira Gordon Baird, of St. John's, and they had four children: David, Paula, Vivian, and Norman.

Bowring Brothers
In 1811 Benjamin Bowring of Exeter, England moved to St. John's, Newfoundland and set up a watch making company. The business soon diversified into importing and selling a wide variety of goods and before long it had expanded into the cod and seal oil trade. In 1834 Bowring returned to England to establish a European end of the export trade operating out of Liverpool, leaving the St. John's branch to be managed by his son.

Charles Tricks Bowring, Benjamin Bowring's eldest son, operated the business, Benjamin Bowring and Son, until 1841 when he returned to England to take over the management of the Liverpool establishment from his father and to establish C. T. Bowring and Company. Two of Benjamin Bowring's other sons, Henry Price and Edward, assumed responsibility for the St. John's firm which by then had become Bowring Brothers. In the 1850s both retired to England leaving the management to their youngest brother, John. The firm continued to be managed by Benjamin Bowring's descendants: Hon. Charles Bowring, Eric Bowring, Edgar Bowring, and Paul Derrick Bowring until 1977.

Bowring Brothers became a thriving business, outfitting fishermen and exporting fishery products. The firm became insurance agents and in the 1870s acquired the contract from the Newfoundland Government to provide a coastal steamer service. The firm also operated a passenger and cargo service between England and St. John's and to points along the eastern seaboard of the United States.

By 1980 Bowring Brothers was one of 160 subsidiaries controlled by C. T. Bowring and Company worldwide. In 1982 C.T. Bowring and Company, by now a public company, was taken over by March and Maclellan, and Bowring Brothers on Water Street, and the chain of shops across Canada and in the United States were sold.

The original scrapbook is located in the Michael Harrington collection, Coll-307.
For more about P. Derrick Bowring see the Bowring Family collection, Coll-157.

William Pearce Moss MF-387

William Pearce Moss Diary 1854
William Pearce Moss Diary 1875-1876

This collection consists of two diaries written by William Pearce Moss of Twillingate. The first and smaller diary is from April 1, 1854 to December 31, 1854. The second diary covers the period from August 24, 1875 to December 13, 1876. Both diaries are a daily record of the weather, births and deaths, along with accounts of arrivals and departures of shipping vessels at Twillingate.

William Pearce Moss was born in 1838 in Twillingate, Newfoundland. We do not know any more about him then what is contained in these two diaries. The first of his diaries was written when he was 16 years old and the second, when he was 37. During these years, Twillingate was the major mercantile centre for Notre Dame Bay, and a fishing centre. It was ofter referred to as " the capital of the north." Fishing and merchant vessels were entering and exiting the harbor daily and Moss records the names of some of these ships in his diaries. Provisions were brought to Twillingate on schooners, many of which were owned by the Slades, an English family running their mercantile business from Poole, England, to Newfoundland.

The end of the 1800's marked an end to the boom. Sailing ships made way for steamers. The Bank Crash of 1894 and the Labrador fishing crisis saw an end to Twillingate's prosperity.

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