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201. The Ground sits fallow across the River The Ground sits fallow across the River Landscape; In the 1930s and 1940s, during the tumultuous years of the Depression and World War II, considerable agricultural land was cleared in Branch. The Ground, just up the River from Roches Gulch, was cleared by and for war veterans returning home to Branch. This large parcel of land sits fallow today, its name an indication of the close relationship between people and land.

202. The fat cat alone, Mary Betts & Brandt Evans' house The fat cat alone, Mary Betts & Brandt Evans' house Animals;

203. The Cock O Wee Path meanders up a grassy slope The Cock O Wee Path meanders up a grassy slope Landscape; The outer cliffs of the Wester Cove give way to grassy slopes, some of which are easily scalable. The Cock O Wee Path meanders up and down such a slope just up from the Big Rock. Marina Gambin writes, This narrow path in the Wester Cove led down to a spring well which offered the coolest, freshest, cleanest water. Before we were granted the convenience of town water, many people who lived on the Hill carried water from the Cock O Wee Path well. It was common to see girls and women walking in that direction with a wooden hoop and two aluminum buckets. The hoop helped keep the water from slopping. Sometimes the area was a social gathering place. The name probably comes from cockawee which is a common long-tailed sea duck of the northern parts of the United States. Maybe cockawees once inhabited this path. Cockawee is also a synonym for old squaw, old wife. Maybe it was named by natives.

204. The Black Wharf juts out into the Cove The Black Wharf juts out into the Cove Architecture, building and construction; Landscape; The Black Wharf was originally a finger pier placed to slow the adverse effects of river sand and tidal action on the depth of the Gut. Over the years, the structural material of the Black Wharf has changed and today this structure is technically a rock breakwater. The first version of the Black Wharf was constructed of wooden pilings in the late 1960s. The pilings where treated with creosote whose black color christened the structure.

205. The Battery, view from Fort Waldegrave Road The Battery, view from Fort Waldegrave Road Architecture, building and construction; Houses; Landscape; Buildings;

206. The Battery Schoolhouse (2) The Battery Schoolhouse (2) Architecture, building and construction; Buildings;

207. The Battery Schoolhouse The Battery Schoolhouse Architecture, building and construction; Buildings;

208. The Battery Hotel, from Upper Battery Road The Battery Hotel, from Upper Battery Road Architecture, building and construction; Buildings;

209. The Battery and Signal Hill as viewed from boat in harbour The Battery and Signal Hill as viewed from boat in harbour Architecture, building and construction; Landscape;

210. The Battery and Signal Hill as viewed from boat in harbour The Battery and Signal Hill as viewed from boat in harbour Architecture, building and construction; Landscape;

211. The Bank overlooks the Landwash The Bank overlooks the Landwash Architecture, building and construction; Landscape; The Bank is a manmade structure. In the mid-1950s, when the Gut was dredged, sand and gravel were piled at the edge of the Landwash, creating the Bank.

212. Taylor, Ronald. Ronald Taylor, Makinsons
 Taylor, Ronald. Ronald Taylor, Makinsons This interview is part of a series of filmed oral histories, collected in 2005 by the Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation, from over 40 elders who grew up in the area. The Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to preserving, promoting and protecting the heritage of the Baccalieu Trail Region. This project includes memories of living and working in the area, going to school, children’s games, home remedies, the first modes of transportation, supernatural beliefs, traditional industries and calendar customs and celebrations. This interview is with Ronald Taylor of Makinsons, NL. The interviewer is Linda Cooper. The camera was operated by Darrell Barrett. The video was edited by Mike Ryan and Darrell Barrett.

213. Target Tilt Gully flows into the River at the Salmon Hole Target Tilt Gully flows into the River at the Salmon Hole Landscape; Gully banks are good places to find various tree species. In the late 1800s, a cooper by the name of Johnny Target spent time in Branch cutting birch wood for use in barrel making. Target built a tilt near this gully and it became known as Target Tilt Gully.

214. Tables used in recreational fishery. 
 Tables used in recreational fishery. Drying (Food preservation); Tables; Drying tables used for fish processing on a property in Quidi Vidi Village.

215. Sunshine on the balcony, 50 Battery Road Sunshine on the balcony, 50 Battery Road Architecture, building and construction; Houses;

216. Sunlight on the water, near Jack Wells' store Sunlight on the water, near Jack Wells' store Houses; Landscape;

217. Sullivan, Tom. Tom Sullivan Interview at his home in Calvert, August 17 2009 Sullivan, Tom. Tom Sullivan Interview at his home in Calvert, August 17 2009 Police officers; Police work Tom Sullivan discusses what he remembers about the Newfoundland Constabulary in Ferryland

218. Stove in Jack Wells' Twine Store Stove in Jack Wells' Twine Store Stoves;

219. Story and Origin of Hunt Roope and Company Story and Origin of Hunt Roope and Company Booklet about the origin and story of Hunt, Roope & Company, Newman, Hunt & Company, and Newman & Company

220. Stone wall, Middle Battery Road Stone wall, Middle Battery Road Architecture, building and construction;
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